Zonta Club 

of Pasadena

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The Zonta Club of Pasadena was chartered on May 16th, 1929, ten years after the international club was founded by playwright and journalist Marian de Forest in Buffalo, New York. We are club #77. Pictured on the right is a photograph of our charter, taken during the club's 80th birthday party. 


One of our charter members was a woman named Grace Nicholson, who was an art dealer specializing in Asian and Native American art. She built a home/studio in Pasadena which is now the Pacific Asia Museum. This is where we held our 80th birthday party. Pictured at left is Grace Nicholson in her youth. 


One of our members became the president of Zonta International in 1962. J. Maria Pierce (pictured at right) was featured on the cover of the Zontian magazine during a trip to Jordan to visit a Zonta-funded project - a vocational school for female Palestinian refugees. This photo is from that photo shoot in Jordan. 


Currently Zonta International has over 31,000 members in 66 countries all over the world. The clubs are divided into 32 Districts worldwide, and each District is further divided into smaller Areas. The Zonta Club of Pasadena is part of Area 3 in District 9.

 


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Currently the Zonta Club of Pasadena is undergoing a major preservation project of our club archives. In the early days of our club Amelia Earhart was a visitor on several occasions. She came to Pasadena to visit her parents. In 1932 our club sent Amelia a Western Union telegram congratulating her for being the first woman pilot to cross the Atlantic Ocean. She wrote back and both the telegram and the reply note have been preserved in our files for nearly eight decades. The file on the right is a scan of the message Amelia wrote to the Zonta Club of Pasadena. 


Amelia also attended the first Christmas party that the Zonta Club of Pasadena held in 1929 at Grace Nicholson's home. She was the first person to sign the Zonta Club of Pasadena Guest Book. It was the Bakersfield Club that proposed the Fellowship to be named in Amelia's honor and to support women in Aeronautics and Engineering. 

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